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  Everest 2006 Nepal side: Dirk Stephan three updates


©EverestNews.com

The sky was dull, it snowed all night, 40cm. The sky rips open at 9 am, I decide to start for Khumjung. Apa's wife gives me a fortune scarf and a wollen hat as a goodbye, then I go. I quickly pass the group of trekkers who has left prior me. Just by accident I transfer a wall of mani-stones vice versa and suddenly I run across a man, who established an embankment of mud in order to keep the melting water from his house. I immediately recognize him. It is Furba Sherpa, he joined us last year at the expedition. He invites me for a cup of tea. From the rear room, converted to a monastery, a monk reads prayers without interruption, items of expeditions all over, like at home, I think myself. We exchange expedition news for this year and conclude to meet again in the base camp. He gives me a second fortune scarf and I move further. The weather looks menacing, but it appears that there is always a sunny window above me, in between the darkness with occasional thunders. Just in front of Namche I turn off the beaten snow mud path, without loosing height I desire to ascent via the mountain back to Syangboche. It turns out to be much more difficult than expected. I pass a terrain without paths, climb upon stonewalls and big stone blocks, jump from stone to stone. Then I approach the path to Namche. More precisely I continue via a combination of a small river's bed, snow mud and mud. Right after Syangboche the sun disappears finally, but I do not fail the beaten path the school children use from Namche to Khumjung. After three hours walking I arrive in Khumjung, 2200 kcal burnt. I am pleased.

Update 2: We visit the monastery, I am excited to see the scalp of the Yeti. Against a donation the metal closet is opened by the Lama. It looks unimpressive, investigations in America expose the scalp as an imitation. This does not affect the legend hereof. I am more impressed by three human scalps, containing butter for ceremonial purposes. We continue to Khunde hospital, founded by the Edmund Hillary´s Himalayan Trust. The citizens of Solokhumbu obtains medical supply for the first time. Later we ascent a mountain's back up to 4.000m. Ngima, in sandals, slips frequently and arrives completely mudded. In the evening a German female trekker appears in the Lodge. She hurt her knee on the way to Thame und reached the hospital on the back of a Sherpa and a horse. She's got no chances to keep on trekking, but pain killers and a supporting bond. I hear that the guide of a well known German expedition agency remains with her group. Tomorrow he wants to look after her..... The sat phone is helpful, the relatives are informed directly - there is no phone in the Lodge.

Update 3: Today there is market in Namche. I get up at 6 am, start at 7 and queue up in the long carrier caravan descending to Namche for shopping. Whole Solokhumbu is alive. The day commences without clouds, the deeper we are, less snow I see, nevertheless the bottom is frozen. We need half an hour to Namche, which is entirely busy. Shoes, chickens, everything is offered. I supplied myself with chocolate for the next two weeks. Midday we ascent to Khumjung. Tommorow we will start the Gokyo-trek. 

Dirk Stephan

Dispatch Index

 

 

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