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  The 2nd team, 1 Indian & 3 Sherpas, of Arun Friendship Everest Team Summit Mt. Everest


A 39 years mountaineer from Orissa, India Mr. Ganesh Chandra Jena along with 03 Sherpas, Mr Ang Kami Sherpa, Mr. Da Jangbu Sherpa & Mr. Tashi Tshering Sherpa (Bhote) known as Tenzing Bhote reached on the summit of Everest on 18th May, 9.20 am (local time) under the leadership of Mrs. Anshu Jamsenpa from Arunacha Pradesh. This is some thing very special news for the people of Orrisa as Ganesh is the 1st man from Orrisa State of India to climb Mt. Everest. More over, Miss. Kalpana Dash is the 1st lady from Orrisa to climb Mt. Everest and Arun Treks & Expeditions also organized her expedition in 2008. Ganesh and Sherpas have started their summit push from South Col on the night of 17th May and now they are descending for Camp II and will arrive at Base Camp by tomorrow. Mr. Ang Kami Sherpa, inhabitant of Gudel-5, Solukhumbu successfully attempted his No. 6th summit and similarly Mr. Da Jangbu Sherpa of Namche-7, Solukhumbu, successfully attempted his No. 2nd summits on Mt. Everest. But Tenzing Bhote from Lelep Ė 9, Taplejung has made his 1st summit on Mt. Everest. We entire family of Arun Treks & Expeditions would like send a huge congratulation to all of them.
News by
Dawa Lama (Arun Treks & Expeditions)
 

Earlier:

This is Dawa Lama from Arun Treks & Expedition, Kathmandu, Nepal. This morning our Everest team have made the summit of Mt. Everest

A 32 years lady from Arunachal Pradesh, India Anshu Jamsenpa along with team Sirdar Mr Lakpa Rangdu Sherpa, Nima Nuru Sherpa, Lakpa Chiree Sherpa, and Miss Churim Sherpa reached on the summit of Everest on 12th May, 7.00 am (Nepali local time) in the morning. Anshu and Sherpas have started their summit push from South Col last night at about 8pm. They are now descending for Camp II and will arrive at Base Camp by tomorrow.   

The expedition Sirdar Lakpa Rangdu Sherpa, inhabitant of lokhim-9, Solukhumbu successfully attempted his No. 6th summit and similarly Mr. Ngima Nuru Sherpa of Namche-4, Solukhumbu, successfully attempted his No. 12th summits on Mt. Everest.  

Miss. Churim Sherpa, age 27 years from Lelep-9, Taplejung has summitted Mt. Everest within 25 days starting from KTM on 18th April and reach on the summit of Mt. Everest on 12th May. I think this is some thing special and it might be a new record among the Nepalese women Mt. Everest Summiteers.  

Our 2nd Summit team has started from Base Camp today morning and they have planned to attempt summit on 15th morning, as 16th morning looks pretty high wind speed.   

There were 9 climbing members consisting 4 Indians, 2 Italian, 1 Iranian, 1 Canadian, and 1 Swedish on our expedition permit team.  

News forwarded by Dawa Lama

Everest from the South Side in Nepal

Base Camp - 17,500 feet (5350 meters)

This is a picture of the popular South Col Route up Mt. Everest.  Base camp is located at 17,500 feet.   This is where climbers begin their true trip up the mountain.  This is also where support staff often remain to monitor the expeditions and provide medical assistance when necessary.  Many organizations offer hiking trips which just go to base camp as the trip is not technically challenging (though you must be very fit). 

From base camp, climbers typically train and acclimate (permitting the body to adjust to the decreased oxygen in the air) by traveling and bringing supplies back and forth through the often treacherous Khumbu Icefall.    This training and recuperation continues throughout the climb, with the final summit push often being the only time to climbers do not go back and forth between camps to train, bring supplies, and recuperate for the next push. 

The Icefall is in constant motion.  It contains enormous ice seracs, often larger than houses, which dangle precariously over the climbers heads, threatening to fall at any moment without warning, as the climbers cross endless crevasses and listen to continuous ice creaking below.  This often acts as a testing ground to judge if less experienced climbers will be capable of continuing.   The Icefall is located between 17,500 and 19,500 feet.

Camp I - 5900 meters

After the Icefall, the climbers arrive at Camp I, which is located at 19,500 feet.  Depending on the type of expedition, Camp I will either be stocked by the climbers as they ascend and descend the Icefall, or by Sherpas in advance.

The area between Camp I and Camp II is known as the Western Cwm.  As the climbers reach Camp II at 21,000 feet, they may be temporarily out of sight of their support at Base camp.  Nonetheless, modern communication devises permit the parties to stay in contact.

Camp II - 6500 meters

As the climbers leave Camp II, they travel towards the Lhotse face (Lhotse is a 27,920 foot mountain bordering Everest).  The Lhotse face is a steep, shiny icy wall.  Though not technically extremely difficult, one misstep or slip could mean a climber's life.  Indeed, many climbers have lost their lives through such mishaps. 

Camp III - 23,700 feet (7200 meters)

To reach Camp III, climbers must negotiate the Lhotse Face. Climbing a sheer wall of ice demands skill, strength and stamina. It is so steep and treacherous that many  Sherpas move directly from Camp II to Camp IV on the South Col, refusing to stay on the Lhotse Face.

Camp IV - 26,300 feet (8000 meters)

As youíre leaving C4Öitís a little bit of a down slope, with the uphill side to the left. There are typically snow on the ledges to walk down on, interspersed with rock, along with some fixed rope. The problem with the rope is that the anchors are bad, and thereís not much holding the rope and a fall could be serious. Fortunately itís not too steep, but there is a ton of exposure and people are usually tired when walking down from camp. The rock is a little down sloping to the right as well, and with crampons on, it can be bit tricky with any kind of wind. Thereís a little short slope on reliable snow which leads to the top of the Geneva Spur, and the wind pressure gradient across the spur can increase there as youíre getting set up for the rappel. Wearing an oxygen mask here can create some footing issues during the rappel, because itís impossible to see over the mask and down to the feet. For that reason, some people choose to leave Camp 4 without gas, as itís easier to keep moving down the Spur when itís important to see all the small rock steps and where the old feet are going. Navigating down through all of the spaghetti of fixed ropes is a bit of a challenge, especially with mush for brains at that point. One lands on some lower ledges which arenít so steep, where fixed ropes through here are solid. At this point, itís just a matter of staying upright, and usually, the wind has died significantly after dropping off the Spur. The route turns hard to the left onto the snowfield that leads to the top of the Yellow Bands.

Camp IV, which is at 26,300 on the Lhotse face, is typically the climbers' first overnight stay in the Death Zone.  The Death Zone is above 26,000 feet.  Though there is nothing magical about that altitude, it is at this altitude that most human bodies lose all ability to acclimate. Accordingly, the body slowly begins to deteriorate and die - thus, the name "Death Zone."  The longer a climber stays at this altitude, the more likely illness (HACE - high altitude cerebral edema - or HAPE - high altitude pulmonary edema) or death will occur.  Most climbers will use oxygen to climb and sleep at this altitude and above.  Generally, Sherpas refuse to sleep on the Lhotse face and will travel to either Camp II or Camp IV.

Camp IV is located at 26,300 feet. This is the final major camp for the summit push.  It is at this point that the climbers make their final preparations.  It is also a haven for worn-out climbers on their exhausting descent from summit attempts (both successful and not).  Sherpas or other climbers will often wait here with supplies and hot tea for returning climbers.

From Camp IV, climbers will push through the Balcony, at 27,500 feet, to the Hillary Step at 28,800 feet.  The Hillary Step, an over 70 foot rock step, is named after Sir. Edmond Hillary, who in 1953, along with Tenzing Norgay, became the first people to summit Everest.  The Hillary Step, which is climbed with fixed ropes, often becomes a bottleneck as only one climber can climb at a time.  Though the Hillary Step would not be difficult at sea level for experienced climbers, at Everest's altitude, it is considered the most technically challenging aspect of the climb.

Summit - 29,028 feet (8848 meters)

Once the climbers ascend the Hillary Step, they slowly and laboriously proceed to the summit at 29,028 feet.  The summit sits at the top of the world.  Though not the closest place to the sun due to the earth's curve, it is the highest peak on earth.  Due to the decreased air pressure, the summit contains less than one third the oxygen as at sea level.  If dropped off on the summit directly from sea level (impossible in reality), a person would die within minutes.  Typically, climbers achieving the great summit will take pictures, gain their composure, briefly enjoy the view, then return to Camp IV as quickly as possible.   The risk of staying at the summit and the exhaustion from achieving the summit is too great to permit climbers to fully enjoy the great accomplishment at that moment.  

As most readers of this page know, the return trip can be even more dangerous than the climb to the summit.

 

 

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