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  Mt. Everest 2005: Climbing For A Cure: Rob Chang, Director of ECFACE 2005 checking in from Katmandu.


Copyright©Everestnews.com

Update: Hello, this is Rob Chang, Director of ECFACE 2005 checking in from Katmandu.

Well it has been a busy few days since my arrival back to Katmandu.  After my descent off the mountain and heli-vac to the CIWC Clinic, my check-up disclosed PE and CE and an eye issue too.  I've been recouping here and have a few thoughts about this season.

Its been good to see other climbers here, making it back and sharing the stories of all the adventure that was prevalent on Mount Everest this season.  Unfortunately, we still are getting news of hardship and tragedy on the mountain, but most of us veteran climbers are glad to see this long and tough season near its end.   

Last night I had dinner at the Rum Doodle with Mark Tucker and MM's Willie Benegas, and the discussions and conversations were light - which after many of occurrences, were much needed. 

This season obviously heralded in the latest summits ever on the South side, and of course, managed to take the lives of no less than 5 climbers, but as Everest can be, it is still a serious endeavor that brings out the best in people too. 

It was a great observation and learning experience to see other teams try to work so hard to coordinate unlike in the past - and in some respect, a few key players always make it happen - some real credit should be given to these guys, as if they didn't make the initial moves, maybe none of us would have gotten to the top. 

My summit with Ang Pasang on May 31st, along with the historic summit of my Sirdar, Apa, my fellow team member John Gray and Dawa Sherpa will be one of the crowning points of the short 17 year climbing career, but one poignant and crucial thing not to be missed was that there are always leaders, and there are always followers.   

Those who lead on the mountain - helped make success a reality this summit season.  I remember when I asked Apa if we were going to get a shot at the summit, and when he replied "maybe Everest needs a rest this year" I became skeptical.  But one of the key ingredients to mountaineering is partnership and camaraderie, not just amongst your own team, but with others, and to this end, I would like to thank all the teams, especially Mountain Madness (yes still owe for crab Chris), Jagged Globe (thanks for the meat), Shauna Burke and Gary (great salami), IMG and Mark T (laughs, bday, scotch and weather) AAI (Willie, Nellie, Vern and stories/beta) and all those others that brought together a sense of what climbing Everest is really about. 

With the tragedies and mishaps being magnified in the media worldwide, one view seldomn shown in those "aftermath" reports of avalanches, crevasse falls, helicopter crashes were the depth of the friendships that are developed between our teams and their individuals, even when we have differencing views...(sorry about the 10 pickets Willie B).

This is a key part of mountaineering that shines, and I hope all the teams that are still coming down, a safe return to Kat...... Rob

Dispatches

 

Rob Chang Everest Climber, author and motivational speaker. To book Rob e-mail

 
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